A new survey released November 9, outlines the impact of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ community, including experiences with overall health during the pandemic, getting vaccinated and concerns with the Delta variant.

Sponsored by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and conducted by Community Marketing & Insights (CMI) and supported by The Rockefeller Foundation, the data found that 91 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed were very (55 percent) or somewhat (36 percent) concerned about the Delta variant, compared to 72 percent of all adults in the United States. 

Despite high vaccination rates within the LGBTQ community, the report also shows that LGBTQ adults may be more likely to get COVID-19, when compared to the across-the-board adult population in the United States. 

Earlier information released by HRC has shown the disproportionate health risk the LGBTQ community faced during the pandemic, which suggests why they are far more concerned about the dangers of the Delta variant. The data confirms those living at the intersections of multiple marginalized identities bear the brunt of the pandemic. 


More reported details show rare cases of blood clots forming in recipients of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine have occurred, and for the first time, data has been collected about the concerns with the vaccine among people undergoing hormone replacement therapy and people taking medication for treating or preventing HIV/AIDS.

  • 93 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed have heard something in the news about these rare cases.
  • 20 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed undergoing hormone replacement therapy have concerns about how a COVID-19 vaccine could affect them.
  • 32 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed are concerned that a COVID-19 vaccine will negatively interact with their medication for treating or preventing HIV, regardless of their status, compared to 39 percent of Black LGBTQ adults and 34 percent of Latinx LGBTQ adults.

The research revealed striking contrasts between LGBTQ respondents and the United States’ general population regarding vaccination status, concerns about the Delta variant, and having contracted COVID-19.

  • 91 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed were very (55 percent) or somewhat (36 percent) concerned about the Delta variant, compared to 72 percent of all adults in the United States.
  • 91 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed in the survey were fully vaccinated.
  • 20 percent of LGBTQ adults surveyed said they have tested positive for COVID-19 or are “pretty sure” they have had it despite not receiving an official diagnosis, compared to only 14 percent of all adults in the United States.

“This research is crucial because it is the first-of-its-kind and it achieved such a large number of LGBTQ participants, [which] allows researchers to understand COVID-19 response differences within our community by gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and generation,” says David Paisley, Community Marketing & Insights’ Senior Research Director. “The data also allows us to understand the unique concerns within our community, such as vaccine interaction concerns with HIV medications and hormone therapies.”


While research suggests that the vast majority of LGBTQ adults have some trust in the development of the vaccines, there are still lingering concerns for some in the community.

  • 60 percent of LGBTQ adults said they have a great deal of confidence in the COVID-19 vaccines, compared to 42 percent of Black LGBTQ adults and 53 percent of Latinx LGBTQ adults, which is far higher than reported by all adults (33 percent) in the United States.
  • Six percent of LGBTQ adults said they had no intention of getting the vaccine.
  • Sixty-eight percent of LGBTQ adults said they had to show a government-issued I.D. to get vaccinated and 40 percent of transgender adults did not have their correct name on all of their documents.

Much of the information included here is the culmination of HRC’s previously released reports, which have documented the heightened risk of LGBTQ people, especially those of color and trans individuals, facing negative economic consequences as a result of the virus.

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