HIV org hiring staff

HealthHIV has announced that it has openings for the following positions after it received new funding and was able to expand its programming. The posts are: Project Director: HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STIs; Clinical Capacity Building Assistance Manager; Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) Manager: HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STIs; Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) Coordinator: HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STIs; E-learning Writer/Instructional Designer; eLearning Manager: HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STIs; eLearning Coordinator: HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STIs; Research and Evaluation Manager; and Graphic Designer. Applications are due by Feb. 26. Visit bit.ly/3alNFBu to learn more.
info: healthhiv.org.

WAF sets meeting dates

We Are Family will host their 3rd GSA Coalition Meeting on Feb. 25, 5:30-7 p.m. via Zoom. It will focus on 2021 programming as well as goals and action items for the year. One does not have to belong to a Gay Student Alliance in order to participate. And, one student who signs up and attends will be selected for a $25 Visa gift card. Register online at bit.ly/3qlZnSt. Then on March 31, 5 p.m., applications will be due for the Student Leader Scholarship. This is open to those enrolled in high school who are graduating seniors entering college for the first time from Charleston, Berkeley or Dorchester Counties. Apply online at bit.ly/2NrRtrU.
info: waf.org.

Astrae continues ED search

Astrae Lesbian Foundation for Justice, after pausing its efforts in late 2020, has reopened its search for a new executive director and a restructuring and re-evaluation process. To learn more or to apply, visit bit.ly/3pk1i8S.
info: astraeafoundation.org.

Networks announce series premiere

Fuse (U.S.) and OUTtv (Canada) announced the premiere of “Shine True” slated for March 22 at 10 p.m. The series tracks the journeys of transgender and non-binary young adults leading up to a big life event. It is hosted by transgender musician, artist, activist and life-coach Lucas Silveira and gender non-conforming influencer, activist and model Richie Shazam. Producers shared: “Gender expression can be challenging to navigate for trans and non-binary young adults. In each episode, Silveira and Shazam, along with mentors and role models, guide someone who is transgender or gender non-conforming as they explore their inner identity and passions, which they convert into authentic self-expression and the ability to ‘Shine True.’”
info: fuse.tv.

CMF sips and paints

A virtual fundraiser to benefit the HIV+ and LGBTQ communities in the Triangle will be held and hosted by the Crape Myrtle Festival on March 6, 6 p.m. The winter-themed paint party with Aaron Wallace, “sip (or not) and paint,” gives participants the opportunity to safely create from home (or anywhere one feels inspired). No prior painting experience is needed. Paint supplies are included and will be available for pickup on March 5 from 5-7 p.m. at 7404 Chapel Hill Rd., Suite E, in Raleigh, N.C. Purchase tickets at $48-$80 online at bit.ly/3ahOsU6. Sales end March 3.
info: crapemyrtlefest.org.

MMAA names new leader

The Modern Military Association of America has announced that the board of directors has named Jennifer Dane as the organization’s executive director. Dane is a U.S. Air Force veteran and has served as the organization’s interim executive director since February 2020. “I’m honored and humbled to be entrusted with this role at a critical juncture in our movement’s history,” said Dane. “We’ve come so far and achieved so much thanks to the selfless advocates who never gave up in their fight to overturn discriminatory policies and ensure today’s modern military families have the support they deserve. With so much left to accomplish, I’m proud to lead this organization forward and double down in our incredibly important work to support and defend the LGBTQ military and veteran community.”
info: modernmilitary.org.

Stroupe scholarship apps open

PFLAG Greensboro’s Carter Stroupe Memorial Scholarship is now open to applicants. This is available to high school seniors and college or technical school undergraduates who reside in Guilford, Rockingham, Randolph or Alamance County, North Carolina. In order to qualify, applicants must sign and complete the application, provide a high school or GED transcript (sent by school) and/or a recent college or university transcript plus two reference letters from individuals other than family. A more comprehensive list is available online along with the application at bit.ly/3rT1my2. Deadline to apply is March 20.
info: pflaggreensboro.org.

‘Bama declares trans ID law unconstitutional

In a U.S. District Court for Middle Alabama decision on Jan. 15, it was declared that the state’s transgender ID law was unconstitutional, RVA Magazine reported. Alabama is one of eight states across the U.S. that still “require transgender people to undergo gender-affirmation surgery before they can get a state-issued identification that lists their correct gender identity.”
info: bit.ly/3dbEDJp.

Law firm joins Out

Out Leadership welcomes the law firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (‘Freshfields’) as a new member company, representing the organization’s continued expansion into the legal sector.
info: outkleadership.com.

Hallmark marks D&I progress

After six months at the helm of Crown Media Family Networks, CEO and President Wonya Lucas reported that there has been significant progress in the Hallmark networks’ on-screen diversity and inclusion representation. “We will continue to strive to defy common stereotypes and give our characters more depth and dimension; in short, to more broadly represent the human condition,” she added.
info: yhoo.it/3bl2tQv.

Pride expressed in Nickelodeon song

Children’s classic and rebooted “Blues Clues & You” featured a song, “ABC Song with Blue!,” that highlighted all the letters of the alphabet. In the musical presentation, the letter “P” was said to be “full of Pride.” It was created in rainbow colors with other flags surrounding it representing the transgender, asexual, pansexual, intersex, gender-fluid communities and more, Deadline reported.
info: bit.ly/2ZgcVmv.

Report shows COVID-19 LGBTQ POC impact

Data from a nationally representative sample of adults collected by Axios-Ipsos between August and December 2020 finds that LGBTQ individuals — in particular LGBTQ people of color — have disproportionately experienced the health and economic impacts of COVID-19. Among those tested, an estimated 15 percent of LGBTQ people of color have tested positive for COVID-19, compared to 7 percent of non-LGBTQ white people. In addition, LGBTQ people of color are about twice as likely to have been laid off or furloughed from work and to struggle to pay for household goods compared to non-LGBT white adults.
info: bit.ly/3b19oxU.

Org reports on nonbinary gender identities

Out & Equal has prepared a report on the global history of nonbinary identities that traces nonbinary identities back to 2000 BCE and locates historical touch points of these identities. Download the history PDF at bit.ly/3b9TOQw. To read more on this, visit LGBTQ Nation’s website at bit.ly/3b0jO0M.
info: bit.ly/2MXWDfL.

Black church homophobia focus of podcast

Grammy-winning artist, songwriter and producer Kirk Franklin spoke with SiriusXM Urban View host Clay Cane about his new podcast “Good Words” and called out white evangelicals and Paula White and addressed homophobia in the Black church. He said, “If every Church in America during the 19th and 20th century, well, over the last 400 years would have acknowledged that racism was a sin, and that slavery was a sin, slavery could have never existed in America.” He added, “What is very important to understand is that the pulpit is not a bullying place … A lot of people that maybe profess Christianity, they have views that are not even biblio-centric. It’s their personal views that they do not understand, sometimes maybe the biology of homosexuality, and so they want to find a scripture to try to justify their own homophobic views…you can’t abuse people from a platform because that ain’t love, that’s not the Gospel to take a microphone and weaponize it to hurt people and to condemn people.”
info: youtu.be/7vd2MIFPkbo.

Brown campaign unveiled

A consortium of HIV/AIDS organizations have launched the Timothy Ray Brown “The Berlin Patient” Memorial Campaign. The consortium will raise funds for a memorial boulder with an inscription in the National AIDS Memorial Grove in San Francisco, Calif. and a memorial bench and plaque in Wellness Park adjacent to the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, Calif. Timothy Ray Brown was an American considered to be the first person cured of HIV/AIDS. Brown was diagnosed with HIV while studying abroad in Berlin, Germany in 1995, and later developed acute myeloid leukemia. Brown underwent two stem cell transplantations and discontinued antiretroviral therapy. By the end of 2007, it appeared that the treatment worked — both for his viral infection and for his cancer. Brown was called “The Berlin Patient” at the 2008 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, where his cure was first announced, and after which he dedicated his life to supporting research to search for a cure for HIV. Brown’s leukemia returned, and he passed away on Sept. 29, 2020. The coordinating consortium consists of the National AIDS Memorial, Let’s Kick A.S.S. Palm Springs, amfAR-The Foundation for AIDS Research, Desert Healthcare District & Foundation, HIV & AIDS Research Project-Palm Springs and Until There’s A Cure Foundation. The National AIDS Memorial is serving as fiscal sponsor for the Campaign. A special donation website has been created for contributions, with 100 percent of the tax-deductible funds raised directly supporting the memorials.
info: aidsmemorial.org.

Vandy seeks Southern older recruits

Vanderbilt University has initiated its Social Networks, Aging, and Policy Study and is seeking participants from North Carolina, Alabama and Tennessee. The study focuses on relationships, health and aging. To qualify, participants must also be 50-76 years old and identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, nonbinary, or gender nonconforming.
info: bit.ly/3qkVflv.

Lez relationship course offered

An online course called, “The 12-Week Roadmap to Conscious Lesbian Dating & Lasting Love” from the Conscious Girlfriend Academy is being offered online. Participants become part of the Conscious Girlfriend Academy community alongside other supportive members. “I’ve gotten many unsolicited emails from women who took the “Roadmap” course and say it has positively changed their lives,” says Ruth L. Schwartz, Ph.D., director of Conscious Girlfriend Academy. “Women who’ve found happy partnerships even in their 50s, 60s and beyond — and women who finally feel prepared for the relationships they want.”
info: cgfacademy.com/roadmap.

Meditation guide may heal wounds

Tarot consultant and LGBTQ activist Mark Horn recently released “Tarot and the Gates of Light: A Kabbalistic Path to Liberation.” Horn draws on his life experiences throughout the narrative. He joined the movement’s early post-Stonewall days 50 years ago and was a member of the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activist Alliance. The book is designed to “give queer people a way to heal the spiritual wounds inflicted by mainstream religions, and a path to find their own spiritual connection.” In his book, he guides readers through the traditional, 49-day Kabbalistic practice of counting the Omer, with the non-traditional approach of using the tarot deck to experience “liberating insights.” Rather than using tarot to predict the future, the aim is to lead readers to personal insights that “free them from negative patterns so they can better experience the flow of positive energy in their lives and better create the future results they want. While this bridging of tarot with Jewish mysticism has won praise from leading tarot experts, you might be surprised to learn that it has also been acclaimed by respected rabbis.”
info: gatesoflighttarot.com.

Grants program open for apps

The Williams Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law is currently accepting proposals for the institute’s LGBTQ & Racial Justice Small Grants Program. The program aims to encourage new research on LGBTQ populations, with a particular focus on emerging issues at the intersections of race, sexual orientation and gender identity. Awards will range from $1,000 to $7,500 and scholars from a variety of disciplines are encouraged to apply. Proposals are due March 19.
info: bit.ly/3akkiQb.

Quilt exhibit honors Black lives

In observance of Black History Month, the National AIDS Memorial is honoring Black lives lost to AIDS with a specially curated selection of 56 blocks of the AIDS Memorial Quilt. The exhibition brings to light stories of the men, women and children who have died and the impact AIDS has had on Black Americans. “This virtual exhibition shares stories of hope, healing and remembrance to honor Black lives lost to AIDS,” said John Cunningham, executive director of the National AIDS Memorial. “Our hope is that it helps raise greater awareness about the ongoing struggle with HIV and the impact systemic barriers have to positive health outcomes, particularly among the Black community.” Raniyah Copeland, president and CEO of Black AIDS Institute, said, “Today, Black Americans face the highest impact of HIV/AIDS compared to all other races and ethnicities. This highlights the need to center Black and LGBTQ people in the fight to end the epidemic. By sharing these powerful stories from the Quilt, we can continue to advocate for Black people living with HIV, defy stigma, and create awareness around prevention and treatment options available today that can end HIV in Black communities over the next decade.” In 2013, as part of ongoing awareness and educational efforts, a special Quilt program, Call My Name, was created to draw attention to HIV/AIDS in the Black community and the public health crisis that still exists today. Partners for the exhibition include the Black AIDS Institute, Gilead Sciences and Vivent Health. The exhibition coincided with National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day #NBHAAD on Feb. 7 and is free to the public. It can be viewed through March 31.
info: aidsmemorial.org.

FCSJ releases ‘Changing Tides’

The Freedom Center for Social Justice, in lieu of a year-end report, had published “Changing Tides: Stories and Images of Culture Shift in the South and Beyond,” a document on the center’s learnings and experiences that can be used by organizations in their own work. The project was headed up by Tobias Dean, communications director, and Ari Leventhal, communications fellow. Orders are currently being taken and are available for a suggested contribution of $35 or more. Email info@fcsj.org to learn more. In other news, the organization bid a farewell to outgoing board members Dr. Juan Battle (outgoing chair), Ciara Lilly and Veronica Calderon and welcomes Hope Barrett (chair), Christina Adeleke and Jonathan Barrio to the board, along with Dean.
info: fssj.org.

Lez tech org seeks transformers

Lesbians Who Tech & Allies, in partnership with Fast Company, are creating the Queer 50 — a list of queer women and non-binary individuals who are transforming the worlds of tech, business and beyond. Submit nominations to bit.ly/3b443py by Feb. 26 to be considered.
info: lesbianswhotech.org. fastcompany.com.

Guilford updating resource guide

The Guilford Green Foundation + LGBTQ Center is in the process of updating their LGBTQ-Friendly Business Resource Guide that appears online. Previously listed businesses and organizations should review their information for correctness and should submit updates to info@ggfnc.org. New listers can access a form to provide Guilford with the necessary information for a listing. Suggestions for businesses to add are being gathered by Guilford for publication.
info: bit.ly/37wzWq3. guilfordgreenfoundation.org.

Civil commitment webinar features Carolinian

The University of California, Los Angeles School of Law’s Williams Institute conducted a webinar earlier in February that discussed recent research on the overrepresentation of Black and sexual minority men in civil commitment programs. Panelists, including Trevor Hoppe, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, provided a brief history of civil commitment and the current legal challenges to it. They also examined the need to address violence in communities without further expanding mass incarceration. To view the recorded program, visit bit.ly/37fcJZ8.
info: williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu.

GLAAD praises Super Bowl advertisers

The Los Angeles Blade reported that GLAAD gave kudos to inclusive advertisers who showcased their products via commercials that played during the Super Bowl LV broadcast on Feb. 7. “During one of biggest nights in sports and media, global brands like M&M’s, Michelob ULTRA, Logitech and Paramount are raising the bar for inclusion by featuring LGBTQ icons after last year’s record number of inclusive ads,” said GLAAD President & CEO Sarah Kate Ellis.
info: bit.ly/3rQLR9N.

Join us: This story is made possible with the help of qnotes’ contributors. If you’d like to show your support so qnotes can provide more news, features and opinion pieces like thisgive a regular or one-time donation today.

Lainey Millen

Lainey Millen was formerly QNotes' associate editor, special assignments writer, N.C. and U.S./World News Notes columnist and production director from 2001-2019 when she retired.