Bob Page is a successful gay businessman and respected philanthropist. He’s particularly well known in North Carolina for his dedication to LGBTQ causes and continuing support of the community.

Nationally, he’s the face of Replacements. Ltd., a McLeansville, North Carolina, company that specializes in hard-to-find and vintage dinnerware. Outside of the business, he’s a much-respected philanthropist.

For those that know him or are acquainted with his work, it comes as no surprise he was recently visited by North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper and selected to be the recipient of the governor’s Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award. Following a visit to the Replacements, Ltd. headquarters in McLeansville, Cooper hand-delivered the awarding documentation to Page.

Page posted the following statement on his Facebook account:

“I was very surprised and honored when our friend, Governor Roy Cooper, awarded me the Order of the Long Leaf Pine while visiting Replacements, Ltd. today. Somehow, it is humbling to be recognized with what I am told is the highest award given by the Governor. I look forward to continuing my work for our community and North Carolina. I’m grateful to the Governor and thankful for his leadership.”

While organizations included in this story are certainly not inclusive of all of Page’s philanthropic efforts, it does highlight many of his achievements, which include donation of time and/or financial assistance to EqualityNC (in honor of his efforts they named an award after him), the Guilford Green Foundation, Lambda Legal, The Victory Fund, the Human Rights Campaign (Replacements has received a perfect 100 score from HRC since the list’s inception in 2002) and PFLAG. Additionally, Page is a supporter of LGBTQ journalism through this publication and our new center for community at qnotescarolinas.com

In other areas, he has contributed $100,000 to help resettle Afghan refugees and the same amount to Habitat for Humanity towards home construction efforts.

Originally from the small town of Ruffin, North Carolina, Page is a graduate of UNC Chapel Hill.  He founded Replacements, Ltd. in1981, and has watched the company grow to a hugely successful business that provides classic dinner ware for individuals, film production companies, cruise liners and more.

For years, Replacements, Ltd., has been LGBTQ-friendly and supportive of hiring a diverse mix of employees in the community. Today, that includes more than 400 immigrants from 40 countries. For employees from the LGBTQ community, he has provided insurance and benefits for partners of same-sex couples long before it was commonplace, and supports all-encompassing gender affirming healthcare coverage for members of the Trans Community.

Without question, his list of philanthropic accomplishments reveals a driven individual who is all too happy to give back to the community at home, in the United States and even help with needs on a global level. 

In a profile included on the Replacements, Ltd. website, a particular quote gives us insight as to why Page became the man he is today.

“I grew up on a small farm in Rockingham County, North Carolina,” Page recalled. “My dad was a tobacco farmer. My parents, and the four children in the family all worked on the farm.  My family was poor, but my father always reached out to help others in need by giving them food he could spare from his garden or helping them in other ways.

“My dad taught me a lot about his values of helping others in the community and I think that’s a lot of who I am today. I grew up believing that no matter what your beliefs are, you should have respect for everybody. That’s why here at Replacements we really do believe in rewarding our employees for the quality of their work and their performance and we don’t judge anybody based on anything else. 

“We take a great deal of pride in the diversity we have here, whether it be dozens of former Yugoslavs we have or the number of gay people. We have employees from [many] different countries and we feel that Replacements is probably the most diverse company in this area.

“We take a great deal of pride in this fact.” 

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